publication 21-November-2017 22:19:05

XMM-Newton slew survey discovery of the nova XMMSL1 J070542.7-381442 (V598 Puppis)

Publication date: 11 March 2008

Authors: Read, A.M., et al.

Journal: A&A
Volume: 482
Issue: 2
Page: L1 - L4
Year: 2008

Copyright: ESO

Aims. In an attempt to catch new X-ray transients while they are still bright, the data taken by XMM-Newton as it slews between targets are being processed and cross-correlated with other X-ray observations as soon as the slew data appear in the XMM-Newton archive.
Methods. A bright source, XMMSL1 J070542.7-381442, was detected on 9 Oct. 2007 at a position where no previous X-ray source had been seen. The XMM slew data and optical data acquired with the Magellan Clay 6.5 m telescope were used to classify the new object.
Results. No XMM slew X-ray counts are detected above 1 keV and the source is seen to be ~750 times brighter than the ROSAT All-Sky Survey upper limit at that position. The normally mV ~ 16 star, USNO-A2.0 0450-03360039, which lies 3.5' from the X-ray position, was seen in our Magellan data to be very much enhanced in brightness. Our optical spectrum showed emission lines that identified the source as a nova in the auroral phase; hence, this optical source is undoubtedly the progenitor of the X-ray source - a new nova (now also known as V598 Pup). The X-ray spectrum indicates that the nova was in a super-soft state (with kTeff 35 eV). We estimate the distance to the nova to be ~3 kpc. Analysis of archival robotic optical survey data shows a rapid-decline light curve consistent with what is expected for a very fast nova.
Conclusions. The XMM-Newton slew data present a powerful opportunity to find new X-ray transient objects while they are still bright. Here we present the first such source discovered by the analysis of near real-time slew data.

Link to Publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:200809456


Last Update: 19 September 2011

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