News archive

News archive

In May this year, when Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn aligned , ESA proposed the Cassini-Huygens contest. The competitors had to answer two questions: How big a telescope would be needed to see Cassini/Huygens in mid-May 2000?At what angle with respect to the Sun-Earth line would you see it?
Published: 20 November 2000
Events have moved quickly over the past week as the Cluster mission has passed a series of significant landmarks.
Published: 16 November 2000
It's official. ESA's Cluster mission represents one of the most significant advances in space science over the past 12 months.
Published: 9 November 2000
One of the most exciting things about meteor showers is their sheer unpredictability. Just when astronomers think they know all about a particular shower, something happens to spring a surprise. One of the least predictable of the annual meteor showers is the Leonids, which appears each year around 16-18 November.
Published: 9 November 2000
The European Project on the Sun (EPOS) - a travelling exhibition on the Sun - was successfully inaugurated yesterday by the European Space Agency at the Noordwijk Space Expo, The Netherlands. The "EPOS" exhibition features the work of five teams of young people (14-18 years old) who have collaborated with their local science museums to conceive and produce professional-looking and informative displays.
Published: 9 November 2000
Gamma-ray astronomers and astrophysicists the world over are today being solicited for Guest Observer proposals using ESA's Integral observatory. The European Space Agency officially issued its Announcement of Opportunity (AO-1) on 1st November.
Published: 6 November 2000
Galilean Academy celebrates 400 years with conference on Earth-Moon relations and space explorationAn International Conference on Earth-Moon relationships will take place in Padova from 8 to10 November 2000. This is part of an interdisciplinary initiative celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Galilean Academy of Sciences, Letters and Arts in Padova (Accademia Galileiana di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti). The conference will open in the Aula Magna of the historic University palace.
Published: 2 November 2000
ESA inaugurates the European Project on the SunOn 8/9 November, at Noordwijk in the Netherlands, the European Space Agency (ESA) will inaugurate the "European Project on the Sun" (EPOS), a travelling exhibition conceived and built by European youngsters who have spent the past eight months acting as solar scientists andcommunication experts working on various themes relating to the Sun.
Published: 2 November 2000
The long standing uncertainty over the origins of the X-ray background (XRB) may perhaps be a thing of the past. XMM-Newton observations are backing up the view that this faint glow of X-rays pervading the cosmos comes essentially from many individual but so-far undetected celestial objects and not just from the hot environment within galaxies.
Published: 2 November 2000
It's fewer than 40 years since the first spacecraft to visit Mars, the Mariners, finally demonstrated that there are no canals or thick vegetation on the planet. Since then, our knowledge about Mars has grown dramatically with every subsequent visit by a successful space mission.
Published: 1 November 2000
Twenty-one young European students from six countries have visited the XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre at Villafranca, Spain. The 16-18 year olds were participants in the XMM-Newton "Stargazing" competition held earlier this year.
Published: 29 October 2000
In the second half of the year 2002, ESA will fly a 355-kg payload on Russians next FOTON mission.
Published: 27 October 2000
ESA's ISO Archive celebrates its 1000th userCyberspace is increasingly breaking the frontiers of space and time... in the most universal sense. The Internet provides astronomers with quick short cuts to the most distant places in the Universe. Simply by allowing free access through the web to the images and data gathered by powerful telescopes, light that has travelled many thousand million years is now at your fingertips. A rapidly growing number of researchers are currently using this new resource, and in the process making valuable 'stored-up' discoveries. ESA's ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) Archive - one of the youngest of these astronomical databases - has recently celebrated the registration of 'user number 1000', who happens to be a young Spanish astronomer. He is convinced that "web-accessible databases are completely changing the way we do astronomy".
Published: 25 October 2000
A spectacular new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope of the group of galaxies called Stephan's Quintet provides a detailed view of one of the most exciting star forming regions in the local Universe.
Published: 25 October 2000
The Rosetta Lander Electrical Qualification Model (EQM) is being preparedfor an exhaustive test programme following its safe delivery a two weeks ago tothe premises of Alenia Spazio in Turin, Italy.
Published: 23 October 2000
Now half way through their complex commissioning campaign, the Clusterquartet are well on their way to becoming operational.
Published: 20 October 2000
ESA Press Release nr. 64-2000. At its 147th meeting, held at the Agency's headquarters in Paris on 19 and 20 October, the ESA Council unanimously elected its new Director of Science for the next four years, Prof. David Southwood (UK), who takes over from Prof. Roger-Maurice Bonnet (F) on 1 May next year.
Published: 20 October 2000
A World Class Test in a World Class Facility for a World Class Observatory.In mid-October, a team from the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA will perform a difficult, never-before-done test on one of the Hubble Space Telescopes new solar array panels. Two of these panels, or arrays, will be installed by astronauts in November 2001, when the Space Shuttle Columbia visits Hubble on a routine service mission. The test will ensure that the new arrays are solid and vibration free before they are installed on orbit.
Published: 19 October 2000
An ancient castle looks over ESA's VILSPA establishment, huddled inthe hills on the outskirts of Madrid. Its medieval stonework is thefirst to receive the early morning sunlight, then the line ofEuropean flags and the large white antennae which point skywards. On10 December last, one of these big dishes followed XMM-Newton as itclimbed into orbit.
Published: 19 October 2000
Ominously-named "Cataclysmic Variables" - CVs for short - are not the kind of solar systems one would like to approach. End points of stellar evolution, they are binary systems in which one star is sucking material out of its partner. They revolve around each other very rapidly, typically every few hours. CVs can also exhibit outbursts on the time scale of weeks to months. XMM-Newton has been observing one such cataclysmic variable, named OY Car.
Published: 19 October 2000
14-Apr-2021 15:00 UT

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