Publication archive

Publication archive

Rosetta is an ESA cornerstone science mission to study, in situ, the environment of cometary nuclei and their evolution in the inner solar system. The main scientific objectives of the mission are to investigate the origin of the solar system by studying the origins of comets and to study the relationship between cometary and interstellar material. To enhance the scientific capabilities of the mission, the orbiter spacecraft will carry one probe, a lander which will land on the comet surface of the comet and perform investigations in situ. The Rosetta orbiter spacecraft will be launched in 2003 and, after a 9-year cruise, will begin the cometary close observation phase. By 2012 the in situ investigations will be complete. The lander is being developed by combined effort in Germany, Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Hungary, Finland and Austria.
Published: 02 May 1997
Scientific editor: B. Foing
Editor: A. Wilson The report to the 34th COSPAR Meeting covers the missions of the Scientific Programme of ESA in the areas of astronomy, Solar System exploration and fundamental physics.
Published: 02 September 2002
The four Cluster spacecraft were successfully launched in pairs by two Russian Soyuz rockets on 16 July and 9 August 2000. On 14 August, the second pair joined the first pair in highly eccentric polar orbits, with an apogee of 19.6 Earth radii and a perigee of 4 Earth radii. The very accurate orbital injection and low fuel consumption mean that spacecraft operations could continue for at least two more years after the nominal two-year mission. This is the first time that the Earth's magnetic field and its environment have been explored by a small constellation of four identical spacecraft. Preliminary results show that, as predicted, with four spacecraft we can obtain a detailed three-dimensional view of the Sun-Earth connection processes taking place at the interface between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field.
Published: 02 July 2001
Presented at the 34th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference, 23-26 June 2003, Orlando - Florida
Published: 24 June 2003
We present results from four Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations of the bright, low-mass X-ray binary LMC X-2. During these observations, which span 1 yr and include over 160 hr of data, the source exhibits clear evolution through three branches on its hardness-intensity and color-color diagrams, consistent with the flaring, normal, and horizontal branches (FB, NB, HB) of a Z source and remarkably similar to Z tracks derived for GX 17+2, Sco X-1, and GX 349+2. LMC X-2 was observed in the FB, NB, and HB for roughly 30%, 40%, and 30%, respectively, of the total time covered. The source traces out the full extent of the Z in ~1 day, and the Z track shows evidence for secular shifts on a timescale in excess of a few days. Although the count rate of LMC X-2 is low compared with the other known Z sources due to its greater distance, the power density spectra selected by branch show very low frequency noise characteristics at least consistent with those from other Z sources.We thus confirm the identification of LMC X-2 as a Z source, the first identified outside our Galaxy.
Published: 21 June 2003
This international Conference was organised by the European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILWEG). The papers presented covered a wide range of subjects, including future lunar missions, the technology needed to support these missions, science of the Moon itself, development of the Moon by humans and public outreach.
Published: 02 August 2000

Giorgio Saccoccia
Head of Propulsion and Aerothermodynamics Division

SMART-1 Media Day
3rd April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003

Guiseppe Racca
SMART-1 Project Manager

SMART-1 Media Day
3rd April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003

Eike Kircher
Head of Basic Technology Research Programme Section
Technology Programme Department

SMART-1 Media Day
3 April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003

Bernard H. Foing
Chief Scientist & SMART-1 Project Scientist

SMART-1 Media Day
3 April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003

Peter Rathsman
Project Manager
Sweedish Space Corporation

SMART-1 Media Day
3rd April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003

Peter Rathsman
Project Manager
Sweedish Space Corporation

SMART-1 Media Day
3rd April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003

Sven Grahn
VP Engineering
Swedish Space Corporation

SMART-1 Media Day
3rd April 2003
ESA/ESTEC

Published: 04 April 2003
The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) follows the highly successful Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with a scheduled launch late in this decade. NGST will be larger and more powerful than Hubble. The primary mirror will be 8 metres in diameter and capable of gathering ten times more light than Hubble. NGST will be launched into a special orbit that will keep it 1.5 million km from Earth (four times the distance to the Moon). By remaining in the shadow cast by a huge sunshield, NGST and its instruments will gradually cool to -240°C, giving the telescope an extraordinary sensitivity over a wide range of wavelengths in the infrared region of the spectrum.
Published: 01 January 2001
SMART-1 is the first of the Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology of the ESA Horizons 2000 scientific programme. The SMART-1 mission is dedicated to testing of new technologies for future cornerstone missions, using Solar-Electric Primary Propulsion (SEPP) in Deep Space. The chosen mission planetary target is the Moon. The target orbit will be polar with the pericentre close to the South-Pole. The pericentre altitude lies between 300 and 2000km, while the apocentre will extend to about 10,000km. During the cruise phase, before reaching the Moon, the spacecraft thrusting profile allows extended periods for cruise science. The SMART-1 spacecraft will be launched in the spring of 2003 as an auxiliary passenger on an Ariane 5 and placed into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO). The expected launch mass is about 370kg, including 19kg of payload. The selected type of SEPP is a Hall-effect thruster called PPS-1350. The thruster is used to spiral out of the GTO and for all orbit maneuvers including lunar capture and descent. The trajectory has been optimised by inserting coast arcs and the presence of the Moon's gravitational field is exploited in multiple weak gravity assists. The Development Phase started in October 1999 and is expected to be concluded by a Flight Acceptance Review in January 2003. The short development time for this high technology spacecraft requires a concerted effort by industry, science institutes and ESA centres. This paper describes the mission and the project development status both from a technical and programmatic standpoint.
Published: 01 December 2002
Presentation from the press event marking the beginning of Cluster's operational phase - held at ESA HQ, 16 February 2001.
Published: 16 February 2001
Presentation from the press event marking the beginning of Cluster's operational phase - held at ESA HQ, 16 February 2001.
Published: 16 February 2001
Presentation from the press event marking the beginning of Cluster's operational phase - held at ESA HQ, 16 February 2001.
Published: 16 February 2001
Presentation from the press event marking the beginning of Cluster's operational phase - held at ESA HQ, 16 February 2001.
Published: 16 February 2001
In keeping with ISO's role as an observatory, the majority of its observing time will be available to the astronomical community. The traditional route of Calls for Observing Proposals, followed by peer review, is being used. There has been one Call prior to launch and a single Supplemental Call is foreseen post-launch. The expected high sensitivity of the ISO instruments will lead to observations of relatively short duration, typically tens of minutes to a few hours. This, in turn, means that many thousands of observations using the four highly sophisticated instruments with multiple operating modes will be carried out in ISO's limited lifetime of 18 months. Thus, as many as possible of the processes, from proposal submission to sending specific commands to the satellite to carry out a particular observation, have been automated. In addition, all details of the desired observations have to be specified by the observer in advance of the observation being executed to allow the complex observing programmes to be established.
Published: 01 November 1995
7-Aug-2020 16:08 UT

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