News archive

News archive

The European Space Agency is preparing to launch an armada of scientific spacecraft to study the sun, our local space environment and the far reaches of the universe. These three ground-breaking missions are due for launch between November 1995 and January 1996.
Published: 5 September 1995
ESA's Ulysses Spacecraft, the first probe ever to fly over the poles of the Sun, climbed to its maximum latitude of 80.2 degrees north of the Sun's equator on 31 July 1995, thereby passing another milestone on its historic mission to survey the Sun's environment from a unique vantage point in space.
Published: 29 August 1995
The Cassini/Huygens mission is an intentional co-operative effort planned by NASA and ESA to explore the Saturnian System. The Cassini spacecraft consists of the Cassini Orbiter (provided by NASA) and the detachable Huygens probe (provided by ESA).
Published: 31 July 1995
Apart from heralding the maiden flight of Ariane-5, the end of 1995 is set to be a period of considerable and intense activity for European space science. Three major projects will be launched in the autumn, placing Europe at the forefront of scientific exploration of the universe.
Published: 12 June 1995
The Uysses spacecraft, on its way to the northern pole of the Sun, has confirmed global differences in solar wind speed after completing the first phase of its high-latitude journey over the southern pole of the Sun.
Published: 6 June 1995
After last year's successful repair mission, the Hubble Space Telescope has finally become the powerful observatory it was meant to be, delivering a constant flow of amazing scientific results.
Published: 13 February 1995
After a year the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope is looking further into space with unprecedented clarity than any other instrument and things are not quite as astronomers had expected.
Published: 6 February 1995
This picture taken by the European Space Agency's faint object camera on-board the Hubble Space Telescope resolves, for the first time, one of the smallest stars in our Milky Way galaxy. Called G1623b the diminutive star (right of center) is ten times less massive than the Sun, and 60 000 times fainter. (If it were as far away as the Sun it would only be eight times brighter than the Full Moon).
Published: 16 December 1994
Following a meeting of representatives of the European scientific community and the European Space Agency, held in Rome from 29 September to 1 October, a programme to follow on from Horizon 2000, maintaining continuity, has been defined with a view to incorporation into the ESA long- term plan to be submitted to the Agency's Council meeting at ministerial level in autumn next year.
Published: 10 October 1994
At the end of 1995, Cluster, an ambitious European Space Agency science project using four identical spacecraft to study the Earth's magnetosphere, will be launched from Europe's spaceport in Kourou by the first Ariane 5 launcher.
Published: 29 September 1994
The pass over the Sun's south pole currently being carried out by ESA's probe Ulysses(*) has so far been a total success and has already yielded a first clutch of surprise results concerning this unexplored region.
Published: 16 September 1994
After almost four years, an exploratory voyage crossing regions of the cosmos never before visited by spacecraft is approaching its climax. On 13 September 1994, ESA's Ulysses spaceprobe will reach a point less than 10 degrees from the Sun's south pole.
Published: 30 August 1994
Upon the invitation of the Swiss Government, the European Space Agency (ESA) is organising from Tuesday 31 May to Friday 3 June 1994 an international workshop on present and future plans for study and exploration of the Moon. This meeting will be held in Beatenberg, Switzerland, and attended by European, Russian and Japanese national space agencies as well as by NASA, the National Aeraunotics & Space Administration.
Published: 11 May 1994
The Hubble Space telescope servicing mission in December (STS-61) was a great success and the fully refurbished orbiting telescope produced absolutely remarkable first results just two weeks ago. The 7-member crew who carried out the mission will soon be in Europe to share their experience with the Press, ESA space specialists and the European space community. Public conferences will also be held in Switzerland, the home country of ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier.
Published: 28 January 1994
Just five weeks after the dramatic Hubble servicing mission, the first images from ESA's Faint Object Camera and NASA's Wide Field and Planetary Camera II have become available. The operation to correct the telescope optics was a total success, and the differences are striking. Also, the new solar panels supplied by ESA are performing very well.
Published: 13 January 1994
The first Hubble Space Telescope (*) servicing mission ended this morning with a nighttime landing at the Kennedy Space Centre, Florida. The space shuttle Endeavour emerged from the Florida night sky and touched down at 05:26 UT
Published: 17 December 1993
The Hubble Space Telescope spread its wings this morning clearing the way for the release of the orbiting observatory. The telescope's twin European solar arrays slowly unfurled as shuttle Endeavour passed 593 kilometres above the Atlantic and Indian oceans.
Published: 9 December 1993
The Hubble Space Telescope was fitted with a new set of solar arrays after a 6.5-hour spacewalk by Tom Akers and Kathy Thornton. These unique power-generating wings, supplied by the European Space Agency, will power the telescope for at least the remainder of the decade.
Published: 6 December 1993
The servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope(*) began today with an eight-hour spacewalk. One of the telescope's twin solar arrays was successfully rolled-up at the end of the day but the second array, which had one supporting beam that was bowed and twisted, failed to retract. The astronauts will jettison the troublesome right-hand wing and then proceed with replacement of the arrays as normal.
Published: 5 December 1993
The space shuttle Endeavour blasted off in a blaze of light this morning on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission(*). The spectacular pre-dawn lift-off, visible for hundreds of miles, occurred at 09:27 UT. The launch was delayed from yesterday due to high crosswinds but the weather co-operated today and the shuttle lifted off on time into a clear, moon-lit sky.
Published: 2 December 1993
27-May-2020 16:42 UT

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