News archive

News archive

Scientists from around the world are meeting next week (April 14) to discuss the latest results and science operations issues connected with the Ulysses mission.
Published: 9 April 1999
Dr David Lario, Research Fellow in the Solar System Division of the Space Science Department of ESA has been selected as the winner of the 1999 Scarf Award.This award given to the graduate student judged to have presented and defended the best PhD dissertation in the period under review.
Published: 2 March 1999
Fifty scientists from seven countries met last week to set detailed goalsfor the ESA/NASA Ulysses mission at solar maximum.
Published: 5 November 1998
Recent reports have created a stir among scientists studying the effects of gravity. A team leadby John Anderson, a planetary researcher at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, hasbeen conducting an experiment in celestial mechanics using the radio signals from spaceprobesfar from the Earth, including Pioneers 10 and 11, and Ulysses. In all cases, Anderson and hiscolleagues found that an unexplained Sun-directed force appears to be acting on the spacecraft.
Published: 15 October 1998
The distance between Earth and Ulysses reached its maximum value on 28 August. the spacecraft and its home base are separated by 951 million kilometres (6.36 times theSun-Earth distance).
Published: 17 September 1998
On 17 April, after travelling for more than seven years and covering 3.8 billion kilometres, the space probe Ulysses will complete its first orbit of the Sun. Built in Europe for the European Space Agency, this intrepid explorer has ventured into regions never before visited by any spacecraft. It has journeyed far away from the realm of the planets and gone over the poles of the Sun.
Published: 15 April 1998
ESA's Ulysses Spacecraft, the first probe ever to fly over the poles of the Sun, climbed to its maximum latitude of 80.2 degrees north of the Sun's equator on 31 July 1995, thereby passing another milestone on its historic mission to survey the Sun's environment from a unique vantage point in space.
Published: 29 August 1995
The Uysses spacecraft, on its way to the northern pole of the Sun, has confirmed global differences in solar wind speed after completing the first phase of its high-latitude journey over the southern pole of the Sun.
Published: 6 June 1995
The pass over the Sun's south pole currently being carried out by ESA's probe Ulysses(*) has so far been a total success and has already yielded a first clutch of surprise results concerning this unexplored region.
Published: 16 September 1994
After almost four years, an exploratory voyage crossing regions of the cosmos never before visited by spacecraft is approaching its climax. On 13 September 1994, ESA's Ulysses spaceprobe will reach a point less than 10 degrees from the Sun's south pole.
Published: 30 August 1994
On 9 June 1993, ESA's Ulysses spaceprobe became the first spacecraft to reach a latitude of more than 32 degrees relative to the Sun's equator. In doing so, Ulysses broke the existing record held by Voyager 1, which is currently exploring the depths of space beyond the solar system at a distance of more than 50 AU from the Sun (1 astronomical unit (AU) = 150 million km).
Published: 9 June 1993
Three interplanetary spacecraft, ESA's Ulysses and NASA's Mars Observer and Galileo, now quietly heading towards separate destinations (the poles of the Sun, Mars and Jupiter respectively), may soon prove the existence of waves in the universe's gravitational field by bobbing on ripples in space like corks bobbing on ripples in a pond.
Published: 19 March 1993
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