Fact Sheet

ESA's X-ray space observatory XMM-Newton is unique. It is the biggest scientific satellite ever built in Europe, its telescope mirrors are amongst the most powerful ever developed in the world, and with its sensitive cameras it can see much more than any previous X-ray satellite.

News

News

Mysteriously in-sync pulsar challenges existing theories
13 September 2019

For the first time, astronomers have detected synchronised pulses of optical and X-ray radiation from a mysterious pulsar some 4500 light years away. The observations indicate that a new physical mechanism might be needed to explain the behaviour of fast-spinning sources like this one, known as transitional millisecond pulsars.

Unexpected periodic flares may shed light on black hole accretion
11 September 2019

ESA's X-ray space telescope XMM-Newton has detected never-before-seen periodic flares of X-ray radiation coming from a distant galaxy that could help explain some enigmatic behaviours of active black holes.

How black holes shape galaxies
24 July 2019Data from ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has revealed how supermassive black holes shape their host galaxies with powerful winds that sweep away interstellar matter.
X-rays reveal how cosmic giants meet
24 June 2019Scientists have uncovered an extremely powerful shock wave in a distant part of the Universe where two massive galaxy clusters appear to come into first contact ahead of merging. The study is based on data from several astronomical facilities, including ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray space observatory.
Giant 'chimneys' vent X-rays from Milky Way's core
20 March 2019By surveying the centre of our Galaxy, ESA's XMM-Newton has discovered two colossal 'chimneys' funneling material from the vicinity of the Milky Way's supermassive black hole into two huge cosmic bubbles.
Active galaxies point to new physics of cosmic expansion
28 January 2019Investigating the history of our cosmos with a large sample of distant 'active' galaxies observed by ESA's XMM-Newton, a team of astronomers found there might be more to the early expansion of the Universe than predicted by the standard model of cosmology.

Featured Articles

Featured Articles

Cluster and XMM-Newton pave the way for SMILE
27 August 2019The Solar wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) mission is still four years away from launch, but scientists are already using existing ESA satellites, such as the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory and the Cluster mission studying Earth's magnetosphere, to pave the way for this pioneering venture.
18-Oct-2019 09:18 UT

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https://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton

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