News archive

News archive


Between 4-7 October a symposium on the scientific aspects of the Gaia mission was held at the Observatoire de Paris. The meeting covered the current status of the Gaia mission and reviewed recent working group studies.
Published: 13 October 2004
A new study of a large number of planetary nebulae has revealed that rings, such as those seen here around the Cat's Eye Nebula, are much more common than thought so far and have been found in at least one third of all planetary nebulae.
Published: 9 September 2004
Recognising the challenge posed by the Gaia data analysis, the Netherlands organisation for scientific research (NWO) has awarded a grant of 364,000 Euro in support of preparations for Gaia photometric data analysis.
Published: 19 August 2004
The strong stellar wind and intense ultraviolet radiation of a young hot star is blowing a bubble into the surrounding gas. The object, known as N44F, lies in our neighbouring dwarf galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud.
Published: 13 August 2004
gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed.
Published: 6 August 2004
Herschel's primary mirror blank has been transported to Finland for a final polish prior to the application of the reflective aluminium layer early next year.
Published: 6 July 2004
Hubble has captured a subregion of the second largest star-forming region, N11, in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
Published: 1 July 2004
An international team of astronomers using the world's biggest telescopes have directly measured the mass of an ultra-cool brown dwarf star and its companion dwarf star for the first time.
Published: 15 June 2004
Using data from the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues, both generated from data acquired by the ESA Hipparcos mission, the Hayden Planetarium has developed a high precision model of our galaxy.
Published: 28 May 2004
The Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, has revealed startling new details of HD 44179, commonly called the "Red Rectangle". It is one of the most unusual nebulae known in our Galaxy.
Published: 11 May 2004
A new image of the Bug Nebula, NGC 6302 taken with the Hubble space telescope reveals fresh detail in the bright and extreme planetary nebula.
Published: 28 April 2004
The ESA Directorate of Science has issued an Announcement of Opportunity (AO) for membership of the Instrument Science Team (IST) of NIRSpec.
Published: 18 March 2004
The bubble-like structures seen in this HST image of the nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 1596, reveal the impact of vigorous star birth activity on the interstellar medium.
Published: 3 February 2004
Published: 12 November 2003
Results from the HST played a major role in preparing ESA’s ambitious Rosetta mission for its new target, comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Hubble measured precisely the size, shape and rotational period of the comet.
Published: 5 September 2003
Scientists are celebrating the thousandth scientific publication from ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). ISO is fast becoming one of the world's most productive space missions, even though its operational life ended in 1998.
Published: 23 July 2003
ESA's Integral satellite is detecting gamma-ray bursts at a rate of nearly one per day, establishing itself as a key player in the hunt for these enigmatic explosions.
Published: 23 March 2003
Nature enjoys teasing us. Stars are stars and planets are planets, you may think. In reality it is not as clear-cut as that with the discovery of more and more objects that are neither star nor planet. An Italian team, using observations by ESA's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, has obtained the first detailed evidence that these ambiguous star-planet 'missing links' form in the same manner as stars, tipping the balance in favour of a stellar origin.
Published: 13 November 2001
The impressive rho Ophiuchi cloud is one of the heavenly meeting points for astronomers in search of young stars. Located 540 light-years away in the constellation of Ophiucus, in the celestial equator, this dusty region is the nest of more than one hundred newborn stars. But ESA's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, has also found a surprise hidden in the dust: 30 brown dwarfs, elusive and ambiguous objects considered to be 'failed stars' because they have too little mass to shine as stars. Relatively few of these brown dwarfs have been identified so far, so finding one is like winning a trophy. With this discovery ISO has turned the rho Ophiuchi region into a favourite game reserve for brown-dwarf hunters.
Published: 25 October 2001
25-Apr-2024 08:31 UT

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