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2005 ESLAB Symposium - Trends in Space Science and Cosmic Vision 2020

2005 ESLAB Symposium - Trends in Space Science and Cosmic Vision 2020

Programme Outline

Tuesday 19 April

Opening
12:00 Welcome Address
Southwood, D., ESA/ESTEC, The Netherlands
12:30 The Ongoing Cosmic Vision Planning
Bignami, G., CESR, France
13:00 Lunch Break
Fundamental Physics from Space
14:00 Space as a laboratory for fundamental physics
Schleich, W., Univ. Bremen, Germany
14:30 A mission to explore the Pioneer anomaly
Dittus, H.-J, ZARM, University of Bremen, Germany
14:50 The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) Mission
Turyshev, S., NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, US
15:10 High Precision Tests of the Equivalence Principle
Sumner, T.J., Imperial College London, UK
15:30 The Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission: On Orbit Performance and Implications for Future Missions
Mester, J., Stanford University, US
15:50 Coffee Break
16:20 Pioneering gravitational wave astronomy with LISA
Vitale, S., Univ. of Trento, Italy
16:50 Massive Black Hole Formation And Growth
Bender, P.L., JILA/University of Colorado, US
17:10 The Big Bang Observer: NASA's Vision for Space Gravitational Wave Astronomy after LISA
Hughes, S.A., MIT, US
17:30 Precision Tests of the Equivalence Principle with Ultrastable Clocks
Schiller, S., Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany
17:50 Coherent Matter Wave Inertial Sensors for Precision Measurements in Space
Bouyer, P., Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, France
18:10 Welcome drink and Poster viewing

Wednesday 20 April

Space Astronomy (1)
09:00 Astronomy - context and roadmap
Turon, C., Astronomy Working Group (Chair)
09:15 Other worlds and life in the Universe
Quirrenbach, A., Univ. of Leiden, Netherlands
09:45 Understanding the Planetary Population in our Galaxy
Piotto, G., Univ. Padova, Italy
10:05 A Large UV-optical Telescope for Characterization of the Atmospheres and a Search of Bio-markers in Extrasolar Planets and Satellites
Lecavelier, A., Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, France
10:25 Planetary science and astrobiology with Darwin
Selsis, F., Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon (CRAL), France
10:45 Coffee Break
11:15 The formation of planets, stars and galaxies
Ivison, R., Royal Observatory Edinburgh, UK
11:45 Studying the Formation and Distribution of the Elements using X-ray Spectroscopy
Kaastra, J., SRON, Netherlands
12:00 Current researches and recent discoveries on extra-solar planets and their impacts on a futur space mission like DARWIN
Queloz, M., Geneva Observatory, Switzerland
12:20 The life of stars and their planets
Catala, C., Observatoire de Paris, France
12:40 Probing the birth of the first quasars with the future far infrared mission
Page, M., Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL, UK
13:00 Lunch
Space Astronomy (2)
14:10 The energetic Universe
Barcons, X., Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Spain
14:40 At the Frontier of X-ray Astronomy, Mapping the Rotating Surface of Isolated Neutron stars
Caraveo, P.A., IASF-INAF, Italy
15:00 Opening a New Window to Fundamental Physics and Astrophysics: X-ray Polarimetry
Costa, E., IASF-INAF, Italy
15:20 Prospects in space-based Gamma-Ray Astronomy for Europe (on behalf of the European Gamma-Ray Community)
Knödlseder, J., C.E.S.R., France
15:40 Coffee Break
16:00 The dark side of the Universe
Mellier, Y., IAP, France
16:40 Charting the New Frontier of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarisation
Bouchet, F.R., Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France
17:00 Perspectives for hunting the missing baryons in the local Universe
Richter, P., Bonn University, Germany
17:20 Probing Dark Energy with Supernovae
Pain, R., LPNHE, University of Paris VI, France
18:00 Poster Session
19:00 Conference Dinner

Thursday 21 April

Solar System (1)
09:00 Our understanding of the solar system now and then
Langevin, Y., IAP, France
09:30 Long Lived Martian Geoscience Observatory
Lognonné, P., IPGP & RTN MAGE, France
09:50 The Europa Microprobe In-Situ Explorer (EMPIE)
Velasco, T., TTI, Spain
10:10 The importance of Mars for understanding the evolution of planet habitability in the Solar System
Westall, F., CNRS-Orléans, France
10:30 Coffee Break
11:00 From Sun to Earth and beyond: the Plasma Universe
Horbury, T., Imperial College, UK
11:30 A multi-scale hierarchy of small spacecraft for 3-D investigations of cross-coupling processes in the Earth's spatial environment
Louarn, P., CNRS, France
11:50 Multi-Point, Multi-Scale Investigations of Fundamental Plasma Processes in the Earth's Magnetosphere
Owen, C.J., UCL/MSSL, UK
12:10 The Magnetism of the Solar Interior
Turck-Chièze, S., CEA, France
12:30 A New Diagnostic Window on Cosmic Magnetic Fields and its Application to the Magnetism of the Solar Outer Atmosphere
Trujillo Bueno, J., Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain
13:00 Lunch Break
Solar system (2)
14:00 Tracing the origin of the solar system
Blanc, M., Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, France
14:30 A Multi-Disciplinary Investigation of the Jovian System
Thomas, N., Physikalisches Institut, Univ. Bern, Switzerland
14:50 Towards real comparative planetology: Synergies between Solar–System science and the DARWIN mission
Lammer, H., Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria
15:10 Interstellar Heliopause Probe – System Design Of A Challenging Mission To 200 AU
Lyngvi, A., ESA/ ESTEC, Netherlands
15:30 Coffee Break
16:00 Life and habitability in the solar system and beyond
Horneck, G., DLR, Germany
16:30 On the possible Japan-ESA collaboration in the mission dedicated to multi-scale measurements of the plasma universe
Fujimoto, M., Tokyo Inst. Tech., Japan
16:50 Sub-Mm Wave (Terahertz) Observations of the Solar System Gaseous Planets and Planetary Satellites
Ellison, B., Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK
17:10 Mars ancient climate and evolution: where did water and carbon dioxide go?
Chassefière, E., University P&M Curie and CNRS, France
17:30 Adjourn

Poster Session

The Pioneer Anomaly: the measure of a topological phase defect of light in cosmology
Rosales, J.L., RSEF and Xerox Corporation, Spain

Probing Venus interior by imaging ionospheric perturbations
Garcia, R., Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris

On the relevance of UV astronomy to understand the formation of solar-like planetary systems
Gomez de Castro, A.I., Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

The importance of white dwarf stars in galactic evolution and fundamental physics
Barstow, M., University of Leicester, United Kingdom

Virtual Human Spaceflight: Enabling Technologies and Mission Concepts
Farkin, B., DigitalSpace Europe, Germany

Concerning the distribution of the proposed dark matter in spiral galaxies and the implications for cosmology
Hunter, J. M., United Kingdom

Matter under extreme conditions
Barret, D., CESR Toulouse, France

Venus atmosphere build-up and evolution : Where did water go? May abiotic oxygen-rich atmospheres exist on extrasolar worlds?
Chassefière, E., University P&M Curie and CNRS, France

Observing Relic Gravitational Waves In Various Frequency Windows
Grishchuk, L., Cardiff University, United Kingdom

Were the primordial atmospheres of the three terrestrial planets similar, and how differently did they evolve? Expected information from Venus noble gases and their isotopes
Chassefière, E.,University P&M Curie and CNRS, France

The Europa Microprobe In-Situ Explorer (EMPIE)
Velasco, T., TTI, Spain

ESI: A proposed European Instrument for SPICA and the next generation FIR missions
Swinyard, B., RAL, United Kingdom

We present the case for the concept of a space mission that would simultaneously address the search for planetary transits
Catala, C., Observatoire de Paris, France

Solar / Heliospheric Dynamics and Magnetism - Solar vision 2015-2025
Khodachenko, M., Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria

Prediction of solar flaring and CME activity by means of COnceptual MODelling (COMOD) technology for reconstruction of complex systems
Fomin, B.F., State Electrotechnical University, St.Petersburg, Russian Federation

Habitability of an Earth-like exoplanet under action of the host star intensive CME activity
Khodachenko, M., Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria

The Technology of the Darwin Mission
Herbst, T., MPIA, Germany

POLAR, a compact detector for GRB photon polarization measurements
Produit, N., ISDC, Switzerland

Raman-Microscopy for in situ planetary science
Popp, J., Institut für Physikalische Chemie, FSU Jena, Germany

Structure and chemistry of the interstellar medium, the initial conditions for star formation
Gerin, M., LERMA, France

The Cosmic Star Formation History and the Need for a Panchromatic Analysis
Burgarella, D., Observatoire Astronomique Marseille Provence / LAM, France

Centaurs Seem To Be Most Value Targets For Future Space Probe
Bagrov, A.V., Institute of Astronomy RAS, Russian Federation

Using 3D Instruments to Break the Confusion Limit in Far-IR Cosmological Surveys
Clements, D.L., Imperial College London, United Kingdom

The Sun as a particle accelerator: upper limits of observable energies and far IR continuum
Vilmer, N., Paris Observatory- LESIA, France

After Huygens : Considerations on Future Titan Missions
Lorenz, R., University of Arizona, United States

Key Instrument Technologies for Future Far-Infrared Missions
Poglitsch, A., MPE, Germany

ESPRIT - Exploratory Submm sPace Radio Interferometric Telescope
Helmich, F., SRON, Netherlands

SOLARNET
Dame, L., Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS, France

High-energy observations of neutron stars, and the equation of state of nuclear matter
Mendez, M., SRON, Netherlands

Beleinos: The Sun, the star close to Earth
Appourchaux, T., Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, France

Imaging of the extended envelope of NGC5236 (M83) from the deep surevy exposures of XMM-Newton and GALEX
Warmsteker, W., INTA, Spain

The population characteristics of the oulaying objects of NGC5236 (M83) as determined from the deep survey images of XMM-Newton and GALEX
Bianchi, L., JHU, United States

X-ray exploration of the giant planets, their magnetospheres and the solar connection: from XMM-Newton to XEUS
Branduardi-Raymont, G., Mullard Space Science Laboratory, United Kingdom

The diversity that we may find among terrestrial exoplanets
Despois, D., Observatoire de Bordeaux (CNRS), France

Simbol-X : a formation flying mission for hard X-ray astrophysics
Ferrando, P., CEA / Saclay & APC Laboratory, France

Satellites of giant planets — possible sites for origin and existence of biospheres
Simakov, M., Institute of Cytology, RAS, Russian Federation

The impact of galactic cosmic rays on extrasolar Earth-like planets in close-in habitable zones
Griessmeier, J.-M., Technical University Braunschweig, Germany

The Stellar Catalogue of the Darwin Mission: Fundamental Properties of the Stars and Preparatory Observational Science
Eiroa, C., Departamento de Fisica Teorica. Universidad Autonoam de Madrid, Spain

Future exoplanet detections from space, and Drake’s formula: discussion on different parameters. Implications on further space research and SETI?
Labèque, A., Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, France

A Gamma-Ray Lens for Nuclear Astrophysics
von Ballmoos, P., CESR, France

RAMSES: A Probe to Explore the Sun
LeQueau, D., Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, France

Exploring the hard X-/gamma-ray continuum spectra with Laue lenses
Frontera, F., University of Ferrara and IASF, Italy

Magnetospheric exploration and probing of plasma processes by systems of multiple spacecraft
Louarn, P., CNRS, France

Aperture Synthesis in the FIR from Space
Wild, W., SRON, Netherlands

Unveiling the high energy obscured Universe: hunting collapsed objects physics
Ubertini , P., IASF-INAF, Italy

Solar Microscopy: Unveiling the Sun's Basic Physical Processes at their Intrinsic scales
Solanki, S.K., Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Germany

ASTER-X: the ultimate survey of the X-ray sky
Pareschi, G., INAF-Brera Obs., Italy

Jet and Disk Emission in Radio-Loud AGNs
Palumbo, G.G.C., Bologna University, Italy

Physics and Astrophysics at Ultra High Energies: opening Particle Astronomy from Space
Santangelo, A., IAAT, University of Tuebingen, Germany

FIR- and Submillimetre Heterodyne Spectroscopy of the Giant Planet's Atmospheres and their Moons
Hartogh, P., MPS, Germany

Budget and Roles of Heavy Ions in the Solar System
Sandahl, I., Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden

Fine-scale 3-D Dynamics of Critical Plasma Region: Necessity of Multipoint Measurement
Sandahl, I., Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden

The Scientific Potential of a European Infrared Observatory Mission – Looking Outward from the Formation of Stars and Planets, to the Distant Universe
White, G., University of Kent, United Kingdom

Deep Fields of the Outer Regions of NGC 5236 (M83) in the UV and X-ray
Wamsteker, W., INTA/LAEFF, Spain

Science Case for a Large (>1km) Space Interferometer for Exo-Life studies
Schneider, J., CNRS - Observatoire de Paris, France

Multi-spacecraft Observations from the Sun to the Earth
Harra, L., MSSL/UCL, United Kingdom

Probing Galaxy Evolution through H2 Spectroscopy
Boulanger, F., CNRS, France

Science with UV-Optical 4m Space Telescope with 1 Degree Wide Field Imager
Bedin, L., European Southern Observatory, Germany

Precision Thrusters for Fundamental Physics and Interferometric Planet Finder Missions
Kent, B., Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

The Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model
Bertolami, O., Instituto Superior Técnico, Portugal

Thermal Architecture of the ESI Instrument for SPICA
Griffin, D., RAL, United Kingdom

Discovering Titan
Coustenis, A., Paris Observatory, France

ASPICS, a Formation Flying Couple of Spacecraft for Observing the Solar Corona
Prado, JY., CNES, France

SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) Mission
Matsuhara, H., Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan

ROME, an ESA Topical Team to study the Responses of Organisms to the Martian Environment
Cockell, CS., Open University, United Kingdom

Surveying the Galaxy
Perryman, M.A.C., ESA, Netherlands

Models and Observation of High Energy Emission from Stellar Explosions: Novae and Type Ia Supernovae
Hernanz, M., IEEC-CSIC, Spain

Astrophysics with Digitised Astronomical Plate Archives
Hudec, R., Astronomical Institute, Czech Republic

Far-infrared Emission Lines: Diagnostics of Starformation in the Distant Universe
Isaak, K.G, Cardiff University, United Kingdom

On the Needed Contribution of « Cosmic Vision » Missions to the Monitoring of Space Environment Parameters
Menvielle, M., ESA SWWT

Toward a new generation of giant solar coronagraphs with formation flyer
Vives, S., Lab. d' Astrophysique de Marseille, France

Search for Trojans of the Outer Planets
Albrecht, R.

Press Conference 19 April

Members of the media are invited to a press conference at 10.00 CET on 19 April, at ESA's Visitor Centre (Space Expo) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The press briefing will provide an overview of the current ideas for new missions, the expected results and their implications for the advancement of science and human knowledge.

The pdf versions of the presentations can be downloaded by clicking on the corresponding title in the programme below.

Programme

09:30 Arrival/Registration/Coffee in the Mars Corner at Space Expo
10:00 Welcome
10:00 Present and future of ESA's Science Programme
Prof. David Southwood (ESA Director of Science)
10:15

Hubble: Fifteen years of discovery
Dr. Duccio Macchetto (Head of ESA Space Telescope Division)

10:30 Europe's space science in 15 years' time
Prof. Giovanni Bignami (Chairman of ESA Space Science Advisory Committee)
10:45 Question and answer time
11:00 End

Second announcement & Call for Papers

ESTEC (Noordwijk, The Netherlands)
19-21 April 2005
 

European space science has really matured during the last decades. Astronomical observatories covering all regions from the infrared to gamma rays have been launched. A solar system exploration program has been put in place including comets, the Moon, Titan and Mars, with Venus and Mercury to come, as well as missions to study the Sun and its relation to our planet Earth. Finally, missions targeting the detection and observation of gravitational waves are being developed.

ESA's approach to the definition of the future Science Program involves both direct discussions with the scientific community via its advisory structure and open, competitive calls for proposals. The missions currently in the program were selected using this procedure and cover launches up to 2015. The definition of the program for the period 2015-2025 (Cosmic Vision 2020) is currently ongoing. This time the discussion started with scientific objectives or themes that will be followed later by the identification of specific missions to carry out the selected themes. In the process, technology developments have to be identified together with possibilities for international cooperation. The themes for Cosmic Vision 2020 were presented in a preliminary form during a workshop held in Paris in September 2004. Activities are ongoing to prepare a final proposal in the form of a report to be widely distributed to the scientific community. This symposium will look at a more developed picture.

As an example of the initial recommendations, in the area of solar system exploration, research could be undertaken on the 3-D solar magnetic field as well as the space plasma processes that occur on a hierarchy of scales in the terrestrial and Jovian magnetospheres. The giant planets and particularly their moons, together with sample return missions or subsurface measurements in minor bodies or Mars are also possible areas for future missions.

In the area of space astronomy topics include the study of extrasolar planets, their discovery, formation mechanisms and characterization, and the detection of traces of life, the birth of stars, a deeper understanding of the very beginning of the Universe, as well as its lesser known constituents such as dark matter and dark energy, and the evolving high-energy elements of it, such as the environment of black holes, their structure and their role in structure of the Universe. Finally, in the area of fundamental physics from space, attention is being focused on quantum gravity, matter in the form of Bose-Einstein condensates and more sensitive gravitational wave detectors leading eventually to the measurement of primordial gravitational waves.

Call for Papers

The present announcement is also a call for contributed papers to be presented to the Symposium. Oral presentation will be selected by the SOC from the submitted abstracts, and ample space is available for poster papers. Abstracts are to be submitted electronically, using the form available here by the February 9 deadline. Please note that even if you have provided a preliminary contribution title in your Expression of Interest for your abstract to be considered by the SOC you need to fill the on-line Abstract form.

Please feel free to pass this message to any colleague who might be interested in the meeting and who may not be in the initial mailing list. Note that the invitation is equally open to scientists working both in ESA- and non-ESA-member states.

Full details on the symposium can be found at the symposium website http://www.congrex.nl/05a14/.

Scientific Organizing Committee

Alvaro Gimenez (ESA/ESTEC - chair)
Risto Pellinen (Finnish Meteorological Institute)
Giovanni Bignami (CESR)
Catherine Turon (Obs. Paris Meudon)
Bernard Schutz (MPI for Gravitational Physics)
Peter Cargill (Imperial College)
Fabio Favata (ESA/ESTEC)

Local Organizing Committee

C. Bingham
F. Favata
J. Sanz-Forcada

First announcement

ESTEC (Noordwijk, The Netherlands)
19-21 April 2005

European space science has really matured during the last decades. Astronomical observatories covering all regions from the infrared to gamma rays have been launched. A solar system exploration program has been put in place including comets, the Moon, Titan and Mars, with Venus and Mercury to come, as well as missions to study the Sun and its relation to our planet Earth. Finally, missions targeting the detection and observation of gravitational waves are being developed. ESA's approach to the definition of the future Science Programme involves both direct discussions with the scientific community via its advisory structure and open, competitive calls for proposals. The missions currently in the programme were selected using this procedure and cover launches up to 2015. The definition of the program for the period 2015-2025 (Cosmic Vision 2020) is currently ongoing. This time the discussion started with scientific objectives or themes that will be followed later by the identification of specific missions to carry out the selected themes. In the process, technology developments have to be identified together with possibilities for international cooperation. The themes for Cosmic Vision 2020 were presented in a preliminary form during a workshop held in Paris in September 2004. Activities are ongoing to prepare a final proposal in the form of a report to be widely distributed to the scientific community. This symposium will look at a more developed picture.

As an example of the initial recommendations, in the area of solar system exploration, research could be undertaken on the 3-D solar magnetic field as well as the space plasma processes that occur on a hierarchy of scales in the terrestrial and Jovian magnetospheres. The giant planets and particularly their moons, together with sample return missions or subsurface measurements in minor bodies or Mars are also possible areas for future missions. In the area of space astronomy topics include the study of extrasolar planets, their discovery, formation mechanisms and characterization, a deeper understanding of the very beginning of the Universe, as well as its lesser known constituents such as dark matter and dark energy, and the evolving high-energy elements of it, such as the environment of black holes, their structure and their role in structure of the Universe. Finally, in the area of fundamental physics from space, attention is being focused on quantum gravity, matter in the form of Bose-Einstein condensates and more sensitive gravitational wave detectors leading eventually to the measurement of primordial gravitational waves.

The Symposium

This symposium is an invitation to the wider scientific community to present and discuss in depth the science topics which constitute the broad themes mentioned above. The program will include a number of invited talks, which will give an overview of the science themes, plus a number of contributed talks. Contributions are solicited on all topics of interest to the Cosmic Vision 2020 program, focusing on the scientific aspects. A formal call for abstracts will be circulated early in 2005, together with a preliminary program including a list of invited speakers. A limited number of contributions will be selected by the SOC for oral presentation, and ample space for poster papers will be available. The conference proceedings, containing all the contributions, will be published as a volume in the ESA-SP series.

An "expression of interest" form can be downloaded by following the link on the right side of this page, which should be returned to eslab2005rssd.esa.int by 15 January 2005. The same address can also be used for any question regarding the workshop. Updated information about the Workshop will be made on the RSSD website. Please note that the invitation is equally open to scientists working both in ESA- and non-ESA-member states.

Scientific Organizing Committee

Alvaro Gimenez (ESA/ESTEC - chair)
Risto Pellinen (Finnish Meteorological Institute)
Giovanni Bignami (CESR)
Catherine Turon (Obs. Paris Meudon)
Bernard Schutz (MPI for Gravitational Physics)
Peter Cargill (Imperial College)
Fabio Favata (ESA/ESTEC)

Local Organizing Committee

C. Bingham
F. Favata
J. Sanz-Forcada

Last Update: 1 September 2019
6-Dec-2021 11:19 UT

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