Follow the CHEOPS launch

Follow the CHEOPS launch

Watch the CHEOPS launch live
12 December 2019

CHEOPS, ESA's 'Characterising Exoplanet Satellite', is scheduled for launch from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, at 08:54 UTC (09:54 CET) on 17 December 2019.
Follow the launch live at esawebtv.esa.int. The programme starts at 08:30 UTC (09:30 CET).

Latest News

Latest News

Hubble watches interstellar comet Borisov speed past the Sun [heic1922]
12 December 2019

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has once again captured comet 2I/Borisov streaking through our Solar System on its way back into interstellar space. At a breathtaking speed of over 175 000 kilometres per hour, Borisov is one of the fastest comets ever seen.

Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with the highest energy ever seen [heic1921]
20 November 2019

New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have investigated the nature of the gamma-ray burst GRB 190114C.

Earth's magnetic song recorded for the first time during a solar storm
18 November 2019

Data from ESA's Cluster mission has provided a recording of the eerie 'song' that Earth sings when it is hit by a solar storm.

Hubble captures a dozen Sunburst Arc doppelgangers [heic1920]
7 November 2019

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed a galaxy in the distant regions of the Universe which appears duplicated at least 12 times on the night sky. This unique sight, created by strong gravitational lensing, helps astronomers get a better understanding of the cosmic era known as the epoch of reionisation.

Solar Orbiter ready to depart Europe
18 October 2019

ESA's Solar Orbiter mission has completed its test campaign in Europe and is now being packed ready for its journey to Cape Canaveral at the end of this month, ahead of launch in February 2020.

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Spacecraft Testing

Spacecraft Testing

#5: JUICE begins to take shape
23 October 2019

The assembly of the flight model of ESA's JUICE spacecraft began in September, with the delivery of the spacecraft's primary structure, followed by integration of the propulsion system that will enable the mission to reach and study Jupiter and its moons.

#1: Euclid completes thermal-vacuum balance tests
10 October 2019

This is the first entry in the Euclid Test Campaign Journal, a series of articles covering the main events during testing of the Structural and Thermal Model (STM) and Flight Model (FM) of the spacecraft.

 

#5: Electric and magnetic fields under control for Solar Orbiter
23 September 2019

An important stage in the development of ESA's Solar Orbiter mission was completed between May and June, when a series of tests to validate the electromagnetic compatibility and magnetic properties was carried out on the spacecraft's flight model.

#17: Practice makes perfect for CHEOPS inflight operations
25 June 2019It takes collaboration and teamwork to operate a spacecraft. As the CHEOPS launch approaches, a Europe-wide team is preparing to take control of inflight activities once the satellite is in space.

Latest Articles

Latest Articles

Cluster and XMM-Newton pave the way for SMILE
27 August 2019The Solar wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) mission is still four years away from launch, but scientists are already using existing ESA satellites, such as the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory and the Cluster mission studying Earth's magnetosphere, to pave the way for this pioneering venture.
Shedding light on white dwarfs – the future of stars like our Sun
17 May 2019ESA's Gaia mission has been busy mapping our Milky Way galaxy since 2014, and just over one year ago released its second batch of data on more than one billion stars. Since then, astronomers have been exploring this catalogue to reveal a huge amount of new information about the cosmos. One type of object that has seen an abundance of new...
How Venus and Mars can teach us about Earth
13 May 2019One has a thick poisonous atmosphere, one has hardly any atmosphere at all, and one is just right for life to flourish – but it wasn't always that way. The atmospheres of our two neighbours Venus and Mars can teach us a lot about the past and future scenarios for our own planet.

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14-Dec-2019 09:21 UT

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