News archive

News archive

When the Earth crosses the wake of Comet Tempel-Tuttle on 17 November, European scientistswill use the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescope to detect impacts of cosmic dust. ESA'sEuropean Space Operations Centre (ESOC) has sent out a warning to spacecraft operatorsabout risks to all satellites in the Earth's vicinity on that day, from the Leonid meteorstorm. Countless dust grains thrown out by the comet will slam into the Earth's atmosphereat 71 kilometres per second. The Leonids, as they are called, may produce the mostspectacular shower of meteors, or "shooting stars", seen since 1966.
Published: 15 November 1998
After of two and a half years' work, the Centre Spatial de Lihge (CSL)in Belgium is coming to the end of the calibration tests it hasbeen carrying out on the Mirror Modules of XMM, the European SpaceAgency's X-ray space telescope. In mid-December, after somethermal hardware integration activities, the three flight modules willbe leaving for ESTEC for integration there early next year onto thesatellite platform.
Published: 11 November 1998
Inside a giant clean room in Friedrichshafen, Germany, ESA's first new Cluster II spacecraft is starting to take shape. On 2 November, some six weeks after assembly firstbegan, engineers from Dornier Satellitensysteme began to mate thering-shaped main equipment platform of Cluster flight model #6 with its cylindrical central section.
Published: 10 November 1998
An International Symposium on "the History of ESA" is being held at the Science Museum in London, 11-13 November 1998.
Published: 9 November 1998
Pictures taken this morning show XMM's lower module being prepared by Dornier staff for a week of tests on the shaker in ESTEC's test facilities.
Published: 9 November 1998
Fifty scientists from seven countries met last week to set detailed goalsfor the ESA/NASA Ulysses mission at solar maximum.
Published: 5 November 1998
All fourteen national delegations in the European Space Agency's Science Programme Committee have backed the project to send a spacecraft to Mars in 2003. Support for Mars Express, as this exciting mission is called, is qualified by concern about the long-term budget of ESA's science programme.
Published: 4 November 1998
At its meeting of 2-3 November, ESA's Science Programme Committee (SPC) endorsed the SMART-1 baseline lunar scenario.
Published: 3 November 1998
SOHO has been providing support for the Spartan 201-5 mission, which was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95) on 1 November and successfully captured again two days later.
Published: 3 November 1998
The last of the Rosetta Experiment Intermediate Design Reviews (EIDR) was successfully completed on 28 October, at ESTEC.
Published: 28 October 1998
In astronomy, looking far into space means also looking back in time. This is what ISO has been doing during its so-called 'deep surveys':observation programmes to detect the faintest and farthest objects ever seen at infrared wavelengths.
Published: 28 October 1998
From 26-30 November 1998 a dozen scientists from the helioseismologycommunity will get together for the 2nd Phoebus workshop. The aim of the workshop is to tryto detect solar gravity modes which, so far, have not been detected by any helioseismology.instrumentation either on-board SOHO or from the ground. Thesegravity modes (or g modes) contain a lot of information on the solar core where thethermonuclear reactions take place. The solar core is the last part of the Sunwhich is not yet 'seen' by helioseismology.
Published: 25 October 1998
Most young stars are surrounded by discs of dust and gas which in a fewmillion years will probably condense to form planets. This is one of theresults presented today during the international ISO meeting being held inParis this week, "The Universe as seen by ISO".
Published: 23 October 1998
A seminar will be given in the Space Science Department of ESTEC on Friday 23 rd October by dr. Nicolas Thomas of the Max Planck Institute fur Aeronomie, Lindau Germany, entitled "Mars Pathfinder - Faster, Better, Cheaper?". Dr. Thomas was actively involved in the mission as a member of the Imager team.
Published: 23 October 1998
After the highly successful test flight of the Ariane 503, Martin Huber, Head of ESA's Space Science Department, said:" With the successful launch of Ariane 503, ESA's Science Directorate cannow look forward optimistically to the future as two of its major missions inthe future programme are due to be launched on board Ariane 5's.We will launch the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission, XMM, in 2000, and the Rosettamission will start its journey to a rendez-vous with Comet Wirtanenon board an Ariane 5 rocket in 2003"
Published: 22 October 1998
The bright massive central star in the spectacular Trifid nebula iscreating a second generation of young stars, in a 'chain reaction' processthat is taking place in less than a hundred thousand years. The occurrenceof such a process had been theoretically postulated, but now for the firsttime, the European Space Agency's ISO infrared space telescope is seeing itin unprecedented detail.
Published: 21 October 1998
The European Space Agency's ISO infrared telescope has detected for the first time the presence of the molecule benzene in Saturn's atmosphere, an unexpected result that poses now the new problem of having to explain how this molecule has been produced. This is one of the new findings presented today at the international meeting "The Universe as seen by ISO" that is being held this week in Paris and is attended by 400 astronomers.
Published: 20 October 1998
A system and technology study has been conducted by the European industrial consortium of Alenia (Italy) and Dornier (Germany) and a review of the first phase of this study took place on 15 October at ESTEC.
Published: 19 October 1998
The Third International conference on the Exploration and Utilization of the Moon(3ICEUM) took place at the President hall of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 10-14 October 1998.
Published: 16 October 1998
A huge ring of organic matter surrounding a young star has been observed by the European Space Agency's ISO space telescope. This is a kind of structure never detected before. With this finding ISO shows again a clear example of how the stars and their environment work as nature's chemical factories: not only is water being produced there - as ISO demonstrated -, but complex organic molecules are also present; these molecules are, essentially, the basic building blocks of all living organisms.
Published: 15 October 1998
5-Jun-2020 13:08 UT

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