News archive

News archive

On 9 October 2006, Cassini performs its 20th targeted flyby of Titan. Among other science objectives, Cassini will use the RADAR instrument to image the lakes at high northern latitudes that were discovered during an earlier flyby in July this year.
Published: 9 October 2006
In a dedicated survey, the Hubble Space Telescope has discovered 16 extrasolar planet candidates orbiting a variety of distant stars in our Galaxy, and among these a new class of planets is discovered with an extremely short orbital period.
Published: 4 October 2006
Detailed simultaneous observations by the Cluster spacecraft and the TC-1 Double Star satellite, reveal new characteristics of reconnection sites at the Earth's magnetopause.
Published: 3 October 2006
Using coordinated observations of the CNSA/ESA Double Star and ESA/NASA Cluster missions, a team of European and US scientists reveals new features of magnetic reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause. These results improve our knowledge on how, where and under which conditions the solar wind manages to penetrate the Earth's magnetic shield on the flank of the magnetosphere.
Published: 3 October 2006
Hubble's workhorse, the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), resumed science operations on 1 October 2006 with one of its three channels, the Wide Field Channel (WFC), brought back into service. Historically, this channel has accounted for 70-80% of all observations obtained with the ACS. Observations with the WFC form an integral part of the HST science observing plan for next week.
Published: 2 October 2006
A recent article in the Astrophysical Journal by Renaud et al. presents the results of detailed spectroimaging of the young Cassiopeia A supernova remnant with INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI that constrain the 44Ti signature and production models.
Published: 29 September 2006
A multilingual version of the Huygens Descent movies is now available, thanks to a collaboration between Europlanet and the ESA Communication office.
Published: 26 September 2006
Only 16 days after Titan-17, Cassini returns to Titan for its nineteenth targeted encounter. The closest approach to Titan occurs on Saturday, 23 September, at 18:59 UT at an altitude of 960 kilometres above the surface and at a speed of 5.8 kilometres per second. The latitude at closest approach is 71°, and the encounter occurs on orbit number 29.
Published: 22 September 2006
Astronomers analyzing two of the deepest views of the cosmos have uncovered a gold mine of galaxies, more than 500 that existed less than a billion years after the Big Bang.
Published: 22 September 2006
Following discussions at the recent informal SPC meeting in Vilspa and consultation subsequently with a number of Delegations, it has been decided that the issuance of the Call for Proposals should be postponed.
Published: 21 September 2006
Mars Express has obtained high resolution images of the Cydonia region which lies in the transition zone between the southern highlands and the northern plains on Mars and contains isolated remnant mounds of various shapes and sizes, including the Face on Mars massif.
Published: 21 September 2006
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have photographed one of the smallest objects ever seen around a normal star beyond our Sun.
Published: 7 September 2006
Nearly 47 days after Titan-16, Cassini returns to Titan for its eighteenth targeted encounter. The closest approach to Titan occurs on Saturday, 7 September, at 20:16 UT at an altitude of 1000 kilometers above the surface and at a speed of 6.0 kilometers per second. The latitude at closest approach is 23° N (near the equator), and the encounter occurs on orbit number 28.
Published: 7 September 2006
The SMART-1 observation campaign latest results bring new evidences on SMART-1 impact: timing, location, detection of flash and ejecta, and a firework.
Published: 7 September 2006
A number of software and research positions to work on Gaia-related tasks are offered at European research institutes.
Published: 5 September 2006
In a press conference, held at ESOC on 4 September, the key outcomes of the SMART-1 mission from an operational, technical and scientific perspective were presented. In addition the latest results from the mission were also revealed.
Published: 4 September 2006
At 05h42m21.759s UT, 3 September, a small flash illuminated the surface of the Moon as the European Space Agency's SMART-1 spacecraft impacted onto the lunar soil in Lacus Excellentiae.
Published: 3 September 2006
The SMART-1 mission has ended with a controlled impact with the lunar surface. Last signal from the spacecraft was observed at 05:42.22 UT. Approximate impact coordinates are 34.4 S, 46.2 W on the edge of Lacus Excellentiae.
Published: 3 September 2006
Revised impact predictions have been generated based on the SMART-1 orbit determination from 1 September 2006.
Published: 1 September 2006
Dear Colleague,I am pleased to invite you to respond to the "Announcement of Opportunity" to submit proposals for observations to be performed with Suzaku.
Published: 1 September 2006
19-Jan-2021 06:04 UT

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