News archive

News archive

New observations with the Hubble Space Telescope have determined the age of the stars in the globular Cluster NGC 6752 with unprecedented accuracy. The age of the stars in globular clusters is significant because these stars are believed to have formed during the era of the formation of our galaxy, an event which probably occurred only 1 to 2 billion years after the birth of the Universe itself. An accurate age estimate for these cluster stars is thus regarded as an important means of gauging the age of the Universe.
Published: 28 May 1996
Italian astrophysicists have pushed the Hubble Space Telescope to the limit of its powers in finding the distance of Geminga, a pointlike object 500 light-years from the Earth. It is the prototype of a novel kind of star, a radio-silent neutron star, which may be much more common in the Universe than previously supposed. Geminga is so weak in visible light that Hubble had to stare at the spot for more than an hour to register it adequately. The object is nevertheless one of the brightest sources of gamma-rays in the sky, and its output of this very energetic form of radiation can now be accurately gauged.
Published: 28 March 1996
The turmoil when two vast assemblies of stars crash together is revealed by the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO. This is among the early results announced by astronomers today at ESA's satellite tracking station at Villafranca near Madrid, which commands ISO in its examination of the Universe. Since the satellite's launch on 17 November 1995, teams of astronomers have received invisible light from many cosmic sources while checking their instruments.
Published: 14 February 1996
ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was successfully launched by Ariane during the night of 17 November. The cover closing the cryostat was ejected on 27 November thereby enabling astronomical use of the ISO telescope. All systems on-board the technologically-innovative satellite are working very well, better than specifications and all the ISO instruments have now received first light.
Published: 6 December 1995
The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spacecraft, launched in January 1978, is one of the longest living and most successful spacecraft ever launched. For 18 years the IUE spacecraft was operated jointly by ESA and NASA, where spacecraft control and science operations were distributed with 16 hours science operations from the NASA IUE observatory at GSFC in Maryland and 8 hours from the ESA IUE Observatory at VILSPA near Madrid, Spain.
Published: 16 October 1995
That mission is now set to start on 8 November. Rising into the Kourou sky, launched by Ariane, will be a satellite keenly awaited by astronomers wound the world: ISO, the first real infrared space observatory, built and launched under the responsibility of ESA. its task will be long-duration observation of celestial radiation sources, studying them with unparalleled sensitivity and precision. It will view them in the invisible and cool light of infrared radiation, as yet very largely unexplored. ISO will provide an entirely fresh perspective on the universe. This should provide a major and significant boost to scientists working in many areas of astrophysics, from nearby planets to the most distant quasars, taking in star formation, the dark matter of the universe and superluminous galaxies.
Published: 7 October 1995
After last year's successful repair mission, the Hubble Space Telescope has finally become the powerful observatory it was meant to be, delivering a constant flow of amazing scientific results.
Published: 13 February 1995
After a year the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope is looking further into space with unprecedented clarity than any other instrument and things are not quite as astronomers had expected.
Published: 6 February 1995
This picture taken by the European Space Agency's faint object camera on-board the Hubble Space Telescope resolves, for the first time, one of the smallest stars in our Milky Way galaxy. Called G1623b the diminutive star (right of center) is ten times less massive than the Sun, and 60 000 times fainter. (If it were as far away as the Sun it would only be eight times brighter than the Full Moon).
Published: 16 December 1994
The Hubble Space telescope servicing mission in December (STS-61) was a great success and the fully refurbished orbiting telescope produced absolutely remarkable first results just two weeks ago. The 7-member crew who carried out the mission will soon be in Europe to share their experience with the Press, ESA space specialists and the European space community. Public conferences will also be held in Switzerland, the home country of ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier.
Published: 28 January 1994
Just five weeks after the dramatic Hubble servicing mission, the first images from ESA's Faint Object Camera and NASA's Wide Field and Planetary Camera II have become available. The operation to correct the telescope optics was a total success, and the differences are striking. Also, the new solar panels supplied by ESA are performing very well.
Published: 13 January 1994
The first Hubble Space Telescope (*) servicing mission ended this morning with a nighttime landing at the Kennedy Space Centre, Florida. The space shuttle Endeavour emerged from the Florida night sky and touched down at 05:26 UT
Published: 17 December 1993
The Hubble Space Telescope was fitted with a new set of solar arrays after a 6.5-hour spacewalk by Tom Akers and Kathy Thornton. These unique power-generating wings, supplied by the European Space Agency, will power the telescope for at least the remainder of the decade.
Published: 6 December 1993
The servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope(*) began today with an eight-hour spacewalk. One of the telescope's twin solar arrays was successfully rolled-up at the end of the day but the second array, which had one supporting beam that was bowed and twisted, failed to retract. The astronauts will jettison the troublesome right-hand wing and then proceed with replacement of the arrays as normal.
Published: 5 December 1993
The space shuttle Endeavour blasted off in a blaze of light this morning on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission(*). The spectacular pre-dawn lift-off, visible for hundreds of miles, occurred at 09:27 UT. The launch was delayed from yesterday due to high crosswinds but the weather co-operated today and the shuttle lifted off on time into a clear, moon-lit sky.
Published: 2 December 1993
In one of the deepest celestial surveys yet made by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a small group of previously unknown, interacting galaxies estimated to be three billion light-years away.*Hubble caught the galaxies in an early stage of evolution, and so they offer new clues to developing a much clearer understanding of how galaxies have changed over time.
Published: 8 November 1993
A team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a "double nucleus" in the center of the neighboring spiral galaxy M31, located in the constellation Andromeda."Hubble shows that the M31 nucleus is much more complex than previously thought," says Dr. Tod R. Lauer of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tuscon, Arizona.A nucleus is a dense clustering of stars at the very center of a galaxy.
Published: 20 July 1993
ESA's Science Programme Committee, meeting at the European Space Research and Technology Centre, ESTEC, in Noordwijk (the Netherlands) on 3 and 4 June 1993, has accepted the recommendations of the Space Science Advisory Committee and confirmed INTEGRAL (International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) as the second medium-sized mission (M2) within the framework of the Horizon 2000 scientific programme.
Published: 4 June 1993
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has discovered a new population of exceptionally bright and young star clusters at the heart of a head-on collision between two galaxies.The orbiting telescope also discovered a rotating, pinwheel-shaped disk at the center of the collision. In the Hubble photo, the disk resembles a full spiral galaxy, seen face on. Yet the disk is only ten thousand light-years across, about 1/20 the diameter of the whole galaxy.
Published: 25 May 1993
On Wednesday 10 March 1993 astronauts from ESA and NASA will be at British Aerospace Space Systems Limited, Filton, Bristol, UK, training on the replacement set of solar arrays which they are scheduled to fit to the Hubble Space Telescope at year end.
Published: 17 February 1993
19-May-2024 12:10 UT

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