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Enceladus plumes and Dione

Enceladus plumes and Dione

The international Cassini spacecraft was on its way to its lowest pass yet over the south polar region of Saturn's moon Enceladus when it took this image of the impressive plumes.

Saturn's moon Dione

The plumes are jets of water ice and vapour, mixed with organic compounds. With this flyby coming within a mere 74 km, scientists hope to learn more about the composition, density and variability of these remarkable features of Enceladus. 

A day after the flyby, Cassini imaged Dione, another of Saturn's moons. From a distance of 44 000 km, features like impact craters are clearly visible on the side of the moon that faces away from the Sun.

Notes for editors

The Cassini–Huygens mission is a cooperative project between NASA, ESA and the Italian space agency, ASI. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, DC, USA. The Cassini orbiter and its two cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations centre is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

(This article was originally published on ESA's Space Science Portal.)

Last Update: 1 September 2019
28-Nov-2022 05:58 UT

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