News archive

News archive

The Call for Proposals to use guest observer time on ESA's forthcoming gamma-ray observatory has resulted in 291 individual proposals. These represent approximately 323 million seconds - more than 10 years - of observing time! This is 19 times greater than all the open time available during the first half of the nominal two-year mission.
Published: 28 February 2001
With 460 days before the launch set for April next year, members ofthe INTEGRAL Science Working Team have met to review all issues ofESA's gamma-ray mission. Integration of the spacecraft is proceedingat Alenia, construction of the Proton rocket has started in Russiaand the science teams with instruments still to deliver are doingtheir utmost to overcome development difficulties and meet theschedule.
Published: 21 January 2001
Gamma-ray astronomers and astrophysicists the world over are today being solicited for Guest Observer proposals using ESA's Integral observatory. The European Space Agency officially issued its Announcement of Opportunity (AO-1) on 1st November.
Published: 6 November 2000
At a formal handover in Madrid on 10 October, ESA's Integral project has taken delivery the flight-model of the gamma-ray observatory's Optical Monitor Camera (OMC) from Spain's Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aerospacial (INTA). In two weeks, prime contractor Alenia will start installing the camera on the spacecraft. Integral's Proton launch is set for April 2002.
Published: 11 October 2000
Following a detailed status review of ESAs gamma-ray observatory a new launch date has been selected. A Russian Proton rocket will put Integral into orbit on 22 April 2002.
Published: 19 April 2000
More than 80 astrophysicists from all over the world travelled to the small town of Les Diablerets in the Swiss Alps to learn how to use ESA's Integral satellite, once it is in orbit, to gather powerful gamma-radiation coming from distant objects in the Universe. A gamma-ray telescope is very different from a normal optical telescope. Thus special data analysis is needed to transform the signals measured by the scientific instruments on board Integral to fundamental physical units and images that describe the properties of the radiation entering the telescope
Published: 3 April 2000
How do you know that a satellite in space does exactly what you want it to do? You can't have a close look at the spacecraft once it has been launched. A thorough and systematic series of tests must therefore be carried out before launch to make sure that the commands will have the desired effect and that the data sent by the satellite are correctly interpreted. This is what experts at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt are now doing with Integral, ESA's gamma-ray observatory.
Published: 21 March 2000
In Turin today the Italian satellite builder Alenia Aerospazio presented two ESA spacecraft that will explore the near and far Universe: Integral, the gamma-ray observatory, will gather the most energetic radiation coming from distant objects. Rosetta, the comet chaser, will bring new insights in the formation of our solar system.
Published: 23 November 1999
The contract for the Proton Launcher Adaptation for Integral was signed today at the ESA Permanent Mission in Moscow. This followed the successful completion of a lengthy approval process for the Arrangement between ESA and Russia on Cooperation on the Integral Project.
Published: 14 October 1999
Russian Prime-Minister Vladimir Putin has signed agovernmental letter approving an arrangement between the European SpaceAgency (ESA) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA). According to thearrangement a Proton launcher will put ESA9s Integral, the InternationalGamma-RayAstrophysics Laboratory, into orbit. The spacecraft will be launched in 2001from Baikonur, Kazakhstan.
Published: 24 September 1999
On 23 August 1999 ESA's new gamma-ray observatory, Integral, has passed a most important milestone in its development. The Engineering Model tests, which lasted more than a year and which were to verify that all satellite subsystems and instruments interface well and function as a system, were successfully completed.
Published: 27 August 1999
Europe's most diverse Museum of Transport and Communication in Lucerne, Switzerland opened a new space travel exhibition. In the Cosmorama visitors can experience life in space, but they also learn more about future science missions like Integral, the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2001.
Published: 18 August 1999
To gather the most energetic radiation that comes from space will be the task of Integral, ESA's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory. The spacecraft is scheduled for launch inSeptember 2001 and will help to solve some of the biggest mysteries in astronomy. A new overview of the mission is today published on this web page.
Published: 5 July 1999
To have a look at ESA's Integral spacecraft you have to travel to Turin,Italy. At Alenia Aerospazio engineers are running electrical tests on thegamma-ray observatory that will be launched in 2001.
Published: 28 May 1999
Following a series of payload reviews in January 1999, and subsequent mission analysis by ESA's operations centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, the Integral launch is now planned for 11 September 2001.
Published: 25 March 1999
Flares from the far reaches of the Universe, giant black holes in theheart of galaxies, clouds of radioactive material in our Milky Way,extremely dense remnants of dead stars and starquakes on bizarre,magnetised objects: the list of phenomena that emit powerful gamma raysis long and full of mysteries.
Published: 17 September 1998
Deciphering the processes of the Universe's alchemy which fabricate the elements of stars and galaxies, as well as theendpoints of stellar life, will be the tasks of ESA's INTEGRAL satellite, the INTErnational Gamma-Ray AstrophysicsLaboratory. Gamma-rays are a million times more energetic than visible light and bring us information from stupendousphysical events that made the universe habitable.A unique opportunity for journalists and cameramen to view INTEGRAL will be provided at ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk,The Netherlands on Tuesday 22 September.
Published: 11 September 1998
Over the summer the INTEGRAL spacecraft has successfully passed thetest campaign of its structural and thermal model.
Published: 8 September 1998
The baseline INTEGRAL orbit has been modified to relfect the options available from a Proton launch.
Published: 15 June 1998
A formal Agreement between the European Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency confirms that a Russian Proton launcher will lift ESA's Integral satellite into space in 2001. In return, Russian astronomers will have about a quarter of the observing time on Integral, as it examines gamma-ray sources in the Universe.
Published: 18 November 1997
16-Oct-2021 06:13 UT

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