News archive

News archive

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have photographed one of the smallest objects ever seen around a normal star beyond our Sun.
Published: 7 September 2006
Nearly 47 days after Titan-16, Cassini returns to Titan for its eighteenth targeted encounter. The closest approach to Titan occurs on Saturday, 7 September, at 20:16 UT at an altitude of 1000 kilometers above the surface and at a speed of 6.0 kilometers per second. The latitude at closest approach is 23° N (near the equator), and the encounter occurs on orbit number 28.
Published: 7 September 2006
The SMART-1 observation campaign latest results bring new evidences on SMART-1 impact: timing, location, detection of flash and ejecta, and a firework.
Published: 7 September 2006
A number of software and research positions to work on Gaia-related tasks are offered at European research institutes.
Published: 5 September 2006
In a press conference, held at ESOC on 4 September, the key outcomes of the SMART-1 mission from an operational, technical and scientific perspective were presented. In addition the latest results from the mission were also revealed.
Published: 4 September 2006
At 05h42m21.759s UT, 3 September, a small flash illuminated the surface of the Moon as the European Space Agency's SMART-1 spacecraft impacted onto the lunar soil in Lacus Excellentiae.
Published: 3 September 2006
The SMART-1 mission has ended with a controlled impact with the lunar surface. Last signal from the spacecraft was observed at 05:42.22 UT. Approximate impact coordinates are 34.4 S, 46.2 W on the edge of Lacus Excellentiae.
Published: 3 September 2006
Revised impact predictions have been generated based on the SMART-1 orbit determination from 1 September 2006.
Published: 1 September 2006
Dear Colleague,I am pleased to invite you to respond to the "Announcement of Opportunity" to submit proposals for observations to be performed with Suzaku.
Published: 1 September 2006
This mosaic of images, obtained by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the lunar impact site for the mission.
Published: 31 August 2006
With the Sun's activity currently at a minimum, SOHO may have observed the first sign of the new solar cycle in the form of an active region with reversed magnetic polarity.
Published: 30 August 2006
Two sets of high resolution Hubble data obtained with a 9 month interval, reveal the rapid expansion of the young nearby supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.
Published: 30 August 2006
A recent article by Cao et al. reports new insights obtained from a study of Cluster multi-spacecraft observations, into the important role played by bursty bulk flows in the inner central plasma sheet during magnetic substorms.
Published: 24 August 2006
With the Moon now in its last crescent phase, visible after midnight and before sunset, the next nights offer the last chance to take ground-based pictures of the SMART-1 impact site in sunlight.
Published: 18 August 2006
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered what astronomers are reporting as the dimmest stars ever seen in any globular star cluster.
Published: 17 August 2006
If you are a professional or amateur astronomer and want to contribute to the final phase of the SMART-1 mission, join ESA on the impact ground observation campaign.
Published: 16 August 2006
A team of astronomers, led by Dimitrios Gouliermis, is studying new data from a star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud obtained with Hubble, that reveals the large number of newly formed low-mass stars in the region.
Published: 15 August 2006
Details on the teacher workshop at the European Planetary Science Congress 2006 which was held in Berlin and on the associated online resources.
Published: 9 August 2006
The Astrolab Mission marks the first time that a European scientific programme has been assembled for a long-duration mission. The programme comes predominantly from scientific institutions across Europe, and includes experiments in human physiology, biology, physics and radiation dosimetry.
Published: 9 August 2006
The Science Programme is currently undergoing an external management review which is expected to be completed in the first half of 2007. The review is expected to have a major impact on the Science Programme of ESA over the next ten or more years.
Published: 7 August 2006
29-Jun-2022 15:20 UT

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