News archive

News archive

At 01:16 CEST 25 June 1998 (23:16 UT 24 June), during routine maintenance operations, ground controllers lost contact with the SOHO (Solar and Heliosopheric Observatory) spacecraft and the satellite went into Emergency Sun Reacquisition (ESR) mode. The ESR mode is activatedwhen an anomaly occurs and the spacecraft loses its orientation towards the Sun. When this happens, the spacecraft automatically tries to pointitself towards the Sun again by firing its attitude control thrusters under the guidance of an onboard Sun sensor.
Published: 26 June 1998
Following the ESA's Science Programme (SPC) meeting of 28/29 May "the coupled FIRST/Planck missions will now enter a detailed study phase, encompassing the selected instruments, with the objective of refining a joint mission scenario within reach of a stringent target cost", states Brian Taylor, Head of the Astrophysics Division of the Space Science Department of ESA, in ESA's Astronews No. 35.
Published: 25 June 1998
Following the ESA's Science Programme (SPC) meeting of 28/29 May "the coupled FIRST/Planck missions will now enter a detailed study phase, encompassing the selected instruments, with the objective of refining a joint mission scenario within reach of a stringent target cost", states Brian Taylor, Head of the Astrophysics Division of the Space Science Department of ESA, in ESA's Astronews No. 35.
Published: 25 June 1998
ESA's Science Programme Committee confirmed the payload for Mars Express, at its meeting 28 May. Seven instruments have beenselected for the orbiter and the possibility left open to add a small lander.
Published: 23 June 1998
A total of 24 proposals for technology experiments were received in response to the SMART-1 Announcement of Opportunity on the deadline of 5 June.
Published: 22 June 1998
Any scientists wanting to send instruments to the surface of the planet Mars have until 3 July to offer a small lander that might be carried aboard the European Space Agency mission Mars Express. The selection of a lander, if any, will then be the last stage in defining the scientific payload of Mars Express, which is intended to go into orbit around the Red Planet at the end of 2003. The choice of instruments for the orbiting spacecraft was recently ratified by ESA's Science Programme Committee. This month ESA is inviting tenders to build the spacecraft from three industrial competitors, Alenia/Aerospatiale, Dornier and Matra-Marconi, who have already studied the mission. The project must be fully defined in time for the Science Programme Committee to finally confirm Mars Express.
Published: 19 June 1998
The head of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Science Programme will tell more than 200 astronomers gathered in Belgium today that Europe could play a significant role in the development of a new space telescope.
Published: 18 June 1998
The baseline INTEGRAL orbit has been modified to relfect the options available from a Proton launch.
Published: 15 June 1998
Members of the Cluster II team visited the Baikonur launch site inKazakhstan at the end of May. The team were able to inspect the newStarsem facilities for spacecraft integration.
Published: 12 June 1998
At its 28/29 May meeting the ESA Science Programme Committee (SPC) endorsed the Planck payload proposed by the scientific community.
Published: 9 June 1998
At its meeting of 28/29 May ESA's Science Programme Committee (SPC) unanimously endorsed the recommended scientific payload for the SMART-1 mission.
Published: 7 June 1998
In a rare celestial spectacle, two comets have been observed plunging into the Sun's atmosphere in close succession, on June 1 and 2. This unusual event on Earth's own star was followed on June 2 by a likely unrelated but also dramatic ejection of solar gas and magnetic fields on the southwest (or lower right) limb of the Sun.
Published: 4 June 1998
In its meeting on 28-29 May 1998 the ESA Science Programme Committee (SPC) approved the FIRST/Planck mission for implementation, with a target launch date of 2007.
Published: 4 June 1998
The Huygens off-Sun AGC calibration test was successfully executed on 28 May at 22:04 UTC. The test lasted 33 minutes, including thetwo manoeuvres required to point Cassini's high-gain antenna (HGA) 12 deg away from the Sun and back. The purpose of the test was tocalibrate the automatic gain control (AGC) level of the Huygens receivers in a radio-noise free environment.
Published: 29 May 1998
Scientists have shown for the first time that solar flares produce seismic waves in the Sun's interior that closely resemble those created by earthquakes on our planet. The researchers observed a flare-generated solar quake that contained about 40 000 times the energy released in the great earthquake that devastated San Francisco in 1906. The amount of energy released was enough to power the United States for 20 years at its current level of consumption, and was equivalent to an 11.3 magnitude earthquake, scientists calculated.
Published: 28 May 1998
The European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was switched off on 18 May at 12:00 UT, thereby bringing to a close the highly-successful in-orbit operations of the ISO mission.
Published: 18 May 1998
Astronomers have obtained an unprecedented look at the nearest example of galactic cannibalism - a massive black hole hidden at the center of a nearby giantgalaxy that is feeding on a smaller galaxy in a spectacular collision. Such fireworks were common in the early universe, as galaxies formed and evolved, but are raretoday.
Published: 15 May 1998
The Conference "UV Astrophysics beyond the IUE Final Archive" (11-14 November 1997) was organised to mark the end of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)project by the three Agencies responsible for the design and operations of this ultraviolet telescope in space. It represented the last time that thelarge community of astronomers utilising this amazing Space Observatory would get together to review the progress made in astrophysics usingthe results of IUE.
Published: 8 May 1998
A team of astronomers from the California Institute of Technology announced today that a recently detected cosmic gamma-ray burst was as bright as the rest of the universe, releasing a hundred times more energy than previously theorized.
Published: 6 May 1998
The Sun has tall gyrating storms far larger and faster than tornadoes on the Earth. This unexpected finding is among the latest results from the solar spacecraft SOHO, to be announced at a European Space Agency press briefing on 28 April. British scientists discovered the solar tornadoes in images and data from SOHO's scanning spectrometer CDS. So far they have detected a dozen such events. They occur most frequently near the north and south poles of the Sun and are almost as wide as the Earth.
Published: 24 April 1998
11-Aug-2020 04:56 UT

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